New York travel guide

NEW YORK TRAVEL

YOUR TRAVEL GUIDE TO NEW YORK

New York Travel Guide

New York Parks

New York Parks are a well-known attraction of New York; which is the most populous city in the United States, according to the census of 2010, the population increased to 19,378,102 of New Yorkers that live in its 62 counties. Parks became into a great option for locals and visitors to enjoy some time of relax and nature with all family, especially with kids, adult people and pets in places not too far from the city, but well-protected from the noise and agitation of the city.

Parks in New York are controlled by New York City Department of Parks and Recreation that also features Tennis Reservations, Beaches, Nature Preserves, Parks merchandise, Public art, Walking Programs and the State parks. State Parks are scattered throughout the city, those parks include opportunities for individuals to improve their skills on skates, skateboards and bikes; especially designed with different facilities.

Central Park

Central Park


With about twenty-five million visitors annually, Central Park is an amazing oasis of green in the middle of a city full of chaos. The park was designed by Frederick Law Olmstead and architect Calvert Vaux, it was the first landscaped park in the United States and a National Historic Landmark since 1963. The park contains numerous walking tracks, jogging trails, lakes, athletic fields, restaurants, the Hayden Planetarium, the Metropolitan Museum, the Central Park Conservatory Garden, the Museum of Natural History, the Central Park Zoo, the ice-skating Wollman Rink (restored by Donald Trump) and the outdoor Delacorte Theater which hosts the "Shakespeare in the Park" annual festival. A must is a visit to Strawberry Fields, the monument to John Lennon who lived in the Dakota building on the Upper West Side.


Prospect Park

Prospect Park


Prospect Park is a 585-acre urban oasis famous for its intricate wetlands and its trees. Located in the heart of Brooklyn, the Park was designed by Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux, the same architect who designed Central Park. Prospect Park features the 90-acre Long Meadow, the 60-acre Prospect Lake, the Picnic House, the Prospect Park Zoo, the first urban-area Audubon Centre, the Children's corner with an historic carousel and dozens of recreational facilities. Celebrate Brooklyn! Festival is held here.


Fort Tryon Park

Fort Tryon Park


Fort Tryon Park is a small but beautiful park that sits on Northern Manhattan's West Side. It was named after William Tryon the last British governor of colonial New York during the colonial War. The Fort Tryon Park land was purchased by John D. Rockefeller in 1917; he contracted Frederick Law Olmstead, Jr., son of the architect of Central Park, to design the park, and gave it to New York City as a gift in 1935. The park possesses pristine views of the Hudson River, the George Washington Bridge, the New York Palisades and the Harlem River. The main attraction is The Cloisters; a museum styled after medieval buildings that houses nearly 5,000 medieval art works including the Unicorn Tapestries.


Astoria Park

Astoria Park


Astoria Park is a 70-acre park situated along the East River in the borough of Queens. The park offers beautiful views of the skyscrapers of midtown Manhattan and the Queensboro and Hell Gate Bridges. The Park also contains the New York City’s largest swimming pool, the Robert Moses' Astoria Pool, opened on 1936 July 4 and designed to accommodate nearly 3,000 people. Other attractions include bocce courts, three baseball diamonds, six tennis courts, basketball courts, two playgrounds, one track for running, a soccer field, and lots of quiet corners to set up your picnic. An important event held every year is the Queens Symphony Orchestra concert on Independence Day during the fireworks show.


Battery Park

Battery Park


Battery Park, located at the Battery, is one of New York City’s oldest public parks and a lovely place to spend an afternoon on a beautiful day. Battery Park offers many interesting attractions, it houses the Castle Clinton National Monument and the Museum of Jewish Heritage, at the north end of the park is Pier A, a memorial to AIDS victims. Along the waterfront, there are ferries picking up visitors to the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island. The Battery is named for cannons mounted there by the Dutch and British in order to protect the harbour.


Columbus Park

Columbus Park


In the mid of 19th century, Columbus Park was known as Five Points and was notoriously ruled by villains and thieves. Now a meeting place of the Chinatown community. Columbus Park is a great park for people watching, hundred of people congregate here to sit and socialize, in the morning you will see women and men practicing tai chi and kung fu, in the afternoon you will see men betting on dominoes, women playing Mahjong, fortune-tellers and watercolour artists offering their wares.


Adirondack Park

Adirondack Park


The Adirondack Park was created in 1892 and is the largest government-protected park in the United States outside of Alaska. The park covers some 24,700 km² (6 million-acres), almost half of the land within the Adirondack Park is directly controlled by the state’s Forest Preserve, while the rest is privately owned, including villages, farms, businesses and camps. The Adirondack Park is a popular destination for all lovers of outdoor activities.


Washington Square Park

Washington Square Park


Washington Square Park is one of the central attractions in Greenwich Village, it serves as a meeting place and centre for artistic activity, it used to be a popular beatnik hangout in the 60s. The two most famous attractions of the park are the fountain, which is one of the city’s popular spots for residents and tourists, and the Washington Arch, designed by Stanford White to commemorate the centennial of George Washington’s inauguration. Before it became a park, the area was used as a marsh, a cemetery, and as a parade ground.


Hudson River Park

Hudson River Park


Hudson River Park is a waterside park on the Hudson River that extends from 59th street south to Battery Park in the borough of Manhattan; it is the biggest park in Manhattan after Central Park. The park offers a tremendous array of things to do. There are numerous fields and courts inside; including tennis, soccer, basketball courts, there are also batting cages, recreational piers and many other features. Hudson River Park is a great place if you want to enjoy a relaxing time.


About us | Contact us | Disclaimer | Privacy Policy | Legal Terms

© 2005 - 2017 - All rights reserved.